Aloha and Satnom. I am a spirit traveler. I like video games, anime, science, space, flow arts, dancing, yoga, art and spirituality.
Come here and become aware.
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from iamyournymphetamine  2,199 notes

Look, let’s give it up. Let’s just lay around and make love and take walks and talk a little. Let’s drive down and look at the ocean. It’s only 45 minutes. Let’s play games in the arcades. Let’s go to the races, the Art Museum, the boxing matches. Let’s have friends. Let’s laugh. This kind of life like everybody else’s kind of life: it’s killing us. By Charles Bukowski (via eluciidate)

Reblogged from superconspicuous  78 notes
academicatheism:

Chimps show empathy by mimicking pupil size
Chimpanzees and humans may share the same ability to empathise with other individuals by involuntarily matching their pupil size. The mimicry only appears to work between two humans or between two chimpanzees but not between species, suggesting the signalling reinforces social bonds within species.
We already know that pupils change shape in response to a new, unfamiliar target: they tend to constrict initially and, after a fraction of a second, readjust and dilate. There’s evidence that human pupils dilate more rapidly while adjusting if their owner is interacting with another human whose pupils are also dilating. The dilation-adjustment happens more slowly if the other human’s pupils are constricting. But it is unclear when this pupil mimicry began in evolutionary terms.
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academicatheism:

Chimps show empathy by mimicking pupil size

Chimpanzees and humans may share the same ability to empathise with other individuals by involuntarily matching their pupil size. The mimicry only appears to work between two humans or between two chimpanzees but not between species, suggesting the signalling reinforces social bonds within species.

We already know that pupils change shape in response to a new, unfamiliar target: they tend to constrict initially and, after a fraction of a second, readjust and dilate. There’s evidence that human pupils dilate more rapidly while adjusting if their owner is interacting with another human whose pupils are also dilating. The dilation-adjustment happens more slowly if the other human’s pupils are constricting. But it is unclear when this pupil mimicry began in evolutionary terms.

Continue Reading